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Percentage of adults who self-report either binge drinking (consuming 4 or more (women) or 5 or more (men) alcoholic beverages on a single occasion in the last month) or chronic drinking (consuming 8 or more (women) or 15 or more (men) alcoholic beverages per week

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Excessive Drinking

United States Excessive Drinking (2014-2015) see more
  • Percentage of adults who self-report either binge drinking (consuming 4 or more (women) or 5 or more (men) alcoholic beverages on a single occasion in the last month) or chronic drinking (consuming 8 or more (women) or 15 or more (men) alcoholic beverages per week
Ranking Value State
1 10.3 West Virginia
2 11.6 Tennessee
3 12.1 Utah
4 13.3 Alabama
5 13.5 Oklahoma
6 13.6 Kentucky
7 13.8 Mississippi
8 14.3 Arkansas
9 15.1 New Mexico
9 15.1 North Carolina
11 15.5 South Carolina
12 15.6 Georgia
13 15.8 Indiana
14 16.1 Idaho
14 16.1 Missouri
16 16.5 New York
17 16.6 Arizona
17 16.6 Virginia
19 16.8 Maryland
20 17 Florida
21 17.1 Kansas
22 17.2 California
22 17.2 Delaware
24 17.3 New Jersey
25 17.4 Texas
26 17.6 Connecticut
26 17.6 Nevada
28 17.7 Louisiana
28 17.7 Pennsylvania
30 18.3 South Dakota
31 18.5 Wyoming
32 18.8 Washington
33 18.9 New Hampshire
33 18.9 Oregon
35 19 Colorado
35 19 Maine
37 19.1 Ohio
38 19.6 Massachusetts
39 20.2 Rhode Island
40 20.4 Michigan
41 20.6 Vermont
42 20.8 Montana
43 21.1 Hawaii
44 21.2 Minnesota
45 21.4 Illinois
45 21.4 Nebraska
47 21.7 Alaska
48 22.3 Iowa
49 23.3 Wisconsin
50 25 North Dakota

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Excessive Drinking
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Overview

Excessive Drinking is the percentage of adults that report either binge drinking (consuming 4 or more (women) or 5 or more (men) alcoholic beverages on a single occasion in the past 30 days) or chronic drinking (consuming 8 or more (women) or 15 or more (men) alcoholic beverages per week.  The 2015 ranks are based on self-report data from CDC’s 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). 

The prevalence of excessive drinking ranges from a low of 10.3% in West Virginia to a high of 25% in North Dakota. The national prevalence of excessive drinking is 17.6%.

Public Health Impact

Excessive drinking is a leading cause of premature mortality in the United States, accounting for 1 in 10 deaths among working adults.[1],[2] From 2006 to 2010 there was an annual average of 87,798 alcohol-attributable deaths and 2.5 million years of potential life lost due to excessive alcohol use.[3] In that same time span, an average of 12,460 motor vehicle traffic crashes were attributed to excessive drinking.[4]

Excessive alcohol use includes binge drinking and chronic drinking;[5] it can lead to fetal damage, liver diseases, high blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases, and other major health problems.[6]

In 2006 excessive alcohol use cost states a median of $2.9 billion, or $1.91 per state for each alcoholic beverage consumed.[7] The costs due to excessive drinking were from losses in workplace productivity, increased health care expenses, criminal justice expenses, motor vehicle crash costs, and property damage.[8] The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends clinicians screen adults aged 18 years and older for alcohol misuse and provide persons engaged in risky or hazardous drinking with brief behavioral counseling interventions to reduce alcohol misuse.[9] A variety of evidence-based strategies have been shown to be effective in preventing excessive drinking and reducing economic costs, and the Community Preventive Services Task Force has published several recommended interventions.[10]

Reducing the proportion of adults reporting excessive alcohol use in the past 30 days and reducing the number of deaths attributable to alcohol are objectives in Healthy People 2020, with a target to improve rates 10% by 2020.[11]



[1] Stahre M, Roeber J, Kanny D, et al. Contribution of excessive alcohol consumption to deaths and years of potential life lost in the United States. Prev Chronic Dis. 2014;11:130293.

[2] Stahre M, Roeber J, Kanny D, et al. Potential life lost in the United States. Prev Chronic Dis. 2014; 11: 130293.

[3] Stahre M, Roeber J, Kanny D, et al. Potential life lost in the United States. Prev Chronic Dis. 2014; 11: 130293.

[4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Alcohol and public health: alcohol-related disease impact (ARDI) application, 2013; http://nccd.cdc.gov/DPH_ARDI/Default.aspx. Accessed July 8, 2015.

[5] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fact sheets—moderate drinking: alcohol and public health. http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/moderate-drinking.htm. Updated March 3, 2015. Accessed July 8, 2015.

[6] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Alcohol and public health. www.cdc.gov/alcohol/. Updated July 26, 2012. Accessed August 3, 2012.

[7] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The high cost of excessive drinking to states. http://www.cdc.gov/features/costsofdrinking/. Updated February 5, 2015. Accessed July 7, 2015.

[8] The High Cost of Excessive Drinking to States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). http://www.cdc.gov/features/costsofdrinking/. Updated February 5, 2015. Accessed July 7, 2015.

[9] US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening and behavioral counseling interventions in primary care to reduce alcohol misuse: recommendation statement. AHRQ Publication No. 12-05171-EF-3. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf12/alcmisuse/alcmisuserfinalrs.htm. Updated March 2015. Accessed July 3, 2015.

[10] Guide to Community Preventive Services. Preventing excessive alcohol consumption. www.thecommunityguide.org/alcohol/index.html. Updated May 28, 2015. Accessed July 3, 2015.

[11] Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy People 2020. http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/substance-abuse/objectives. Updated July 8, 2015. Accessed July 8, 2015.