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Percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report having had a fall within the last 12 months

Trend

History


Falls

United States Falls (2013-2016) see more
  • Percentage of adults age 65 and older who report having had a fall within the last three months.
  • Percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report having had a fall within the last 12 months
Ranking Value State
1 20.6 Hawaii
2 23.6 New Jersey
3 24.9 Louisiana
4 25 Florida
5 25.1 Maryland
6 25.6 Virginia
7 26.1 Minnesota
8 26.5 Connecticut
9 26.6 West Virginia
10 26.8 Rhode Island
11 26.9 Nevada
12 27.1 Colorado
13 27.2 North Dakota
14 27.4 Illinois
15 27.5 Arizona
16 27.7 New York
17 27.8 New Mexico
17 27.8 Wisconsin
19 28 Delaware
19 28 Mississippi
19 28 New Hampshire
19 28 North Carolina
23 28.1 Nebraska
24 28.5 South Dakota
25 28.6 Georgia
25 28.6 Massachusetts
25 28.6 Pennsylvania
28 29.2 South Carolina
29 29.4 Alabama
30 29.6 Utah
31 29.9 Idaho
31 29.9 Maine
33 30.1 Ohio
33 30.1 Tennessee
35 30.3 Texas
36 30.5 Kansas
37 30.7 California
38 30.8 Oklahoma
39 31.2 Washington
40 31.6 Iowa
41 31.7 Oregon
41 31.7 Vermont
43 31.8 Indiana
44 32.1 Kentucky
44 32.1 Wyoming
46 32.2 Montana
47 32.4 Missouri
48 32.6 Michigan
49 32.9 Alaska
50 34.3 Arkansas

Highlights

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Overview

Falls is the percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report having fallen at least once in the past 12 months. The senior ranks are based on 2014 data from CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). 

The percentage of adults aged 65 and older who have fallen within the past 12 months ranges from 20.6% (95% CI: 18.2%, 23.0%) in Hawaii to 34.3% (95% CI: 31.5%, 37.0&) in Arkansas. Nationally, 28.7% (95% CI: 28.2%, 29.1%) of seniors have fallen in the past year.

Annually, 1 in 3 adults aged 65 and older fall; 20% to 30% percent of these falls result in injuries that affect the ability to engage in daily activities.[1],[2] Falls and their resulting injuries may limit mobility, contribute to social isolation, and even cause premature death. Medicare bears nearly 80% of falls-related medical expenses, which totaled approximately $34 billion in 2013.[3] The average cost of 1 fall is $9,000 to $13,000.[4] Falls often lead to painful and costly hip fractures that severely limit mobility for long periods of time. The risk of falls and injury increases with age, making falls particularly problematic for persons older than age 75. The National Institute on Aging offers suggestions for preventing falls. Additionally, the Cochrane Library has a review on the effectiveness of interventions for preventing falls in older adults.



[1] Hausdorff JM, Rios DA, Edelberg HK. Gait variability and fall risk in community-living older adults: a 1-year prospective study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001;82(8):1050.

[2] Stevens JA, Mack KA, Paulozzi LJ, Ballesteros, MF. Self-reported falls and fall-related injuries among persons aged ≥ 65 years—United States, 2006. Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008; 57: 225–9.

[3] Towne SD, Ory MG, Smith ML. Cost of Fall-Related Hospitalizations among Older Adults: Environmental Comparisons from the 2011 Texas Hospital Inpatient Discharge Data. Popul Health Manag. 2014;17(6):351-356.

[4] Stevens JA, Corso, PS, Finkelstein, EA, Miller, TR. The costs of fatal and non-fatal falls among older adults. Injury Prevention. 2006;12(5):290-295.