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Percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report their health is very good or excellent

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Health Status - Seniors

United States Health Status - Seniors (2013-2016) see more
  • Percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report their health is very good or excellent
Ranking Value State
1 50.7 New Hampshire
2 50.2 Colorado
3 49.7 Vermont
4 49.3 Maine
5 47.9 Minnesota
6 47.2 Connecticut
6 47.2 Oregon
8 46.8 Washington
9 46.5 Alaska
10 46.1 Idaho
10 46.1 Wisconsin
12 45.9 Massachusetts
13 45.5 Nebraska
14 45.1 Utah
15 44.9 Maryland
16 44.6 Virginia
17 44.5 Arizona
18 44.1 Iowa
19 44 California
20 43.6 Rhode Island
21 43.5 Montana
22 43 Wyoming
23 41.5 Michigan
24 41.4 Florida
24 41.4 New York
24 41.4 Pennsylvania
27 41.2 Kansas
28 41.1 New Jersey
28 41.1 South Dakota
30 40.4 Delaware
31 40.3 Illinois
32 39.9 Nevada
32 39.9 New Mexico
34 39.1 Missouri
34 39.1 Ohio
36 38.9 North Dakota
37 38.8 North Carolina
38 38.3 Indiana
39 38.2 South Carolina
40 38.1 Georgia
41 37.8 Texas
42 37.7 Hawaii
43 35 Tennessee
44 34.9 Oklahoma
45 34.4 West Virginia
46 34 Kentucky
47 33.8 Mississippi
48 33.6 Louisiana
49 33 Arkansas
50 30.4 Alabama

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Health Status - Seniors
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Health Status - Seniors
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Health Status - Seniors
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Health Status - Seniors
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Overview

Health Status is the percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report very good or excellent health. The senior ranks are based on 2014 data from the CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

The percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report their health is very good or excellent varies from 50.7% in New Hampshire (95% CI: 47.9%, 53.5%) to 30.4% in Alabama (95% CI: 28.3%, 32.5%). Nationally, 41.2% (95% CI: 40.7%, 41.7%) of seniors report their health is very good or excellent.

Self-reported health status is an indicator of the population’s self-perceived health. It is a subjective measure that is not limited to certain health conditions or outcomes. It is influenced by life experience, the health of loved ones, and such factors as social support that affect overall well-being.[1] [2] This measure also detects variations in population well-being that go largely unnoticed in standard measurements of disease burden and mortality. Research shows that those with a poorer self-reported health status have higher rates of mortality from all causes, which makes it a valuable measure of comprehensive health.[3] The association between health status and mortality makes it a good predictor of future mortality rates and future health care use as persons with poor health status will likely seek care.[4]



[1] Idler E. In sickness but not in health: Self-ratings, identity, and mortality. J Health Soc Behav. 2004;45(3):336.

[2] Amstadter AB, Begle AMCisler JMHernandez MAMuzzy WAcierno R. Prevalence and correlates of poor self-rated health in the United States: the national elder mistreatment study. Am J Geriat Psychiatry. 2010;18.7: 615.

[3] DeSalvo KB. Mortality prediction with a single general self-rated health question. J Gen Intern Med. 2006;21(3):267.

[4] DeSalvo KB. Predicting mortality and healthcare utilization with a single question. Health Serv Res. 2005;40(4):1234.