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Percentage of adults who self-report sleeping less than 7 hours in a 24-hour period, on average

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Insufficient Sleep

United States Insufficient Sleep (2014-2015) see more
  • Percentage of adults who self-report sleeping less than 7 hours in a 24-hour period, on average
Ranking Value State
1 27.8 South Dakota
2 28.5 Colorado
3 28.9 Minnesota
4 30 Montana
4 30 Nebraska
6 30.1 Iowa
7 30.3 Idaho
7 30.3 Vermont
9 30.5 Kansas
10 30.9 Utah
11 31 North Dakota
11 31 Wyoming
13 31.2 Oregon
14 31.3 Wisconsin
15 31.6 New Mexico
15 31.6 Washington
17 32 New Hampshire
18 32.2 Maine
19 32.4 North Carolina
20 32.7 Arizona
21 33.1 Missouri
22 33.2 Texas
23 33.7 California
24 34.1 Massachusetts
25 34.2 Illinois
26 34.5 Connecticut
27 34.8 Florida
28 35.1 Alaska
29 35.2 Oklahoma
30 35.7 Louisiana
31 35.9 Virginia
32 36.1 Rhode Island
33 36.2 Nevada
34 36.4 Arkansas
34 36.4 Mississippi
36 36.7 Tennessee
37 36.8 Pennsylvania
38 37.1 New Jersey
38 37.1 Ohio
40 37.4 Delaware
40 37.4 West Virginia
42 37.5 Michigan
43 37.7 Indiana
43 37.7 South Carolina
45 38.1 New York
46 38.4 Alabama
47 38.5 Maryland
48 38.8 Georgia
49 38.9 Kentucky
50 44 Hawaii

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Overview

Insufficient sleep is the percentage of adults who report sleeping less than 7 hours in a 24-hour period, on average. The 2015 Rankings are based on 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data.

Insufficient sleep ranges from a high of 44% in Hawaii to a low of 27.8% in South Dakota. Nationally, 34.2% of the population reports insufficient sleep.

Public Health Impact

Insufficient sleep has become a public health epidemic over the last 2 decades.[1] An estimated 70 million US adults suffer from chronic sleep and wakefulness disorders.[2] Sleep is an important determinant of overall health and well-being. Adequate sleep is necessary for optimal sugar metabolism and functioning of the immune system. CDC’s surveillance of sleep behavior has expanded to include data on outcomes associated with sleep insufficiency such as motor vehicle crashes and occupational errors.[3] An estimated 1,500 fatal car accidents and 40,000 non-fatal injuries annually are the result of drowsy drivers.[4]

The National Sleep Foundation recommends adults sleep 7 to 9 hours nightly and school-age children sleep 9 to 11 hours nightly. Everyone should follow a sleep schedule.[5] Adults who average 7 or fewer hours of sleep nightly are more likely to have difficulty performing daily tasks than those who meet sleep recommendations.[6] Inadequate sleep also affects physical health. Adults who average fewer than 7 hours of sleep nightly are more likely to have chronic illnesses including obesity, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and depression; they are also more likely to have a reduced quality of life and productivity.[7]

According to the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, “each year, sleep disorders, sleep deprivation, and sleepiness add an estimated $15.9 billion to the national health care bill. Additional costs to society for related health problems, lost worker productivity, and accidents have not been calculated.”[8] Healthy People 2020 objectives to improve sleep health are to increase the proportion of adults and high school students who get sufficient sleep.

 


[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic. http://www.cdc.gov/features/dssleep/. Updated January 13, 2014. Accessed July 22, 2015.

[2] The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR). National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/org/ncsdr/. Accessed July 23, 2015.

[3] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic. http://www.cdc.gov/features/dssleep/. Updated January 13, 2014. Accessed July 22, 2015..

[4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic. http://www.cdc.gov/features/dssleep/. Updated January 13, 2014. Accessed July 22, 2015..

[5] The National Sleep Foundation. How much sleep do we really need? http://sleepfoundation.org/how-sleep-works/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need/page/0/1. Accessed July 22, 2015.

[6] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic. http://www.cdc.gov/features/dssleep/. Updated January 13, 2014. Accessed July 22, 2015.

[7] Institute of Medicine. Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2006.

[8] The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR). National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/org/ncsdr/. Accessed July 23, 2015.