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Number of infant deaths (before age 1) per 1,000 live births.

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Infant Mortality: Iowa

Iowa Infant Mortality (1990-2014) see more
  • Number of infant deaths (before age 1) per 1,000 live births.

Infant Mortality

United States Infant Mortality (1990-2014) see more
  • Number of infant deaths (before age 1) per 1,000 live births.
Ranking Value State
1 4.2 Massachusetts
2 4.5 Alaska
2 4.5 New Hampshire
4 4.6 California
4 4.6 Vermont
6 4.8 New Jersey
7 4.9 Minnesota
7 4.9 Washington
9 5 Iowa
9 5 Oregon
11 5.1 Colorado
11 5.1 Connecticut
11 5.1 Hawaii
11 5.1 Nebraska
11 5.1 New York
16 5.2 Idaho
16 5.2 Utah
18 5.3 Nevada
19 5.8 Texas
20 5.9 Arizona
20 5.9 Montana
20 5.9 Wyoming
23 6 Wisconsin
24 6.1 New Mexico
25 6.3 Florida
25 6.3 Kansas
25 6.3 North Dakota
28 6.4 Rhode Island
29 6.5 Illinois
29 6.5 Missouri
31 6.6 Georgia
31 6.6 Maine
31 6.6 Maryland
31 6.6 Virginia
35 6.7 Kentucky
35 6.7 Michigan
35 6.7 Pennsylvania
38 7 West Virginia
39 7.2 Arkansas
39 7.2 Indiana
41 7.3 North Carolina
41 7.3 Tennessee
43 7.4 Oklahoma
44 7.5 South Carolina
44 7.5 South Dakota
46 7.7 Ohio
47 8.2 Delaware
47 8.2 Louisiana
49 8.6 Alabama
50 9.1 Mississippi

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Infant Mortality
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Infant Mortality
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Related Measures
Infant Mortality
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Thematic Map
Infant Mortality
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Overview

Infant Mortality is the number of infant deaths that occur before age 1 per 1,000 live births. The 2014 ranks are based on a 2-year average using 2011 and 2012 data from the National Center for Health Statistics National Vital Statistics System.

Infant mortality varies greatly among states, from 4.2 deaths per 1,000 live births in Massachusetts to 9.1 deaths per 1,000 live births in Mississippi. Nationally, the infant mortality rate is 6.0 deaths per 1,000 live births. Healthy People 2020’s leading health indicator is to reduce the rate of all infant deaths to 6.0 deaths per 1,000 live births. 

 

Infant mortality is associated with many factors surrounding birth: maternal health, prenatal care, and access to quality healthcare.[1] Congenital malformations are the leading cause of infant mortality followed by low birthweight and sudden infant death syndrome.[2] Infant mortality is commonly used to compare health between countries because of its association with access to health care in the prenatal period and first year of life. The nation’s overall infant mortality rate is consistently higher than that of other developed countries, and significant sociodemographic disparities persist.[3],[4] In addition to sociodemographic factors, there are many health care system factors that influence infant mortality. Improving access to and utilization of ongoing prenatal care is a key strategy towards decreasing infant mortality, as well as reducing maternal smoking and alcohol consumption.[5] The US Department of Health and Human Services has put together a fact sheet on preventing infant mortality.



[1] Singh GK, Yu SM. Infant mortality in the United States: Trends, differentials, and projections, 1950 through 2010. Am J Public Health. 1995;85(7):957-964.

[2] Matthews TJ, MacDorman MF. Infant mortality statistics from the 2010 period linked birth/infant death data set. National Vital Statistics Reports. 2013:62(8).

[3] MacDorman MF, and Mathews TJ. Recent Trends in Infant Mortality in the United States. Hyattsville, MD: US Dept. of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics; 2008.

[4] Gage TB, Fang F, O'Neill E, Dirienzo G. Maternal education, birth weight, and infant mortality in the united states.Demography. 2013;50(2):615-635.

[5] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guidance for Preventing Birth Defects. 2014. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/prevention.html. Accessed July 10, 2014.