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Percentage of the civilian labor force that is unemployed (U-3 definition).

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Unemployment Rate, Annual: Oklahoma

Oklahoma Unemployment Rate, Annual (1990-2015) see more
  • Percentage of the civilian labor force that is unemployed (U-3 definition).

Unemployment Rate, Annual

United States Unemployment Rate, Annual (1990-2015) see more
  • Percentage of the civilian labor force that is unemployed (U-3 definition).
Ranking Value State
1 2.8 North Dakota
2 3.3 Nebraska
3 3.4 South Dakota
4 3.8 Utah
5 4.1 Minnesota
5 4.1 Vermont
7 4.3 New Hampshire
7 4.3 Wyoming
9 4.4 Hawaii
9 4.4 Iowa
11 4.5 Kansas
11 4.5 Oklahoma
13 4.7 Montana
14 4.8 Idaho
15 5 Colorado
16 5.1 Texas
17 5.2 Virginia
18 5.5 Wisconsin
19 5.7 Delaware
19 5.7 Maine
19 5.7 Ohio
22 5.8 Maryland
22 5.8 Massachusetts
22 5.8 Pennsylvania
25 6 Indiana
26 6.1 Arkansas
26 6.1 Missouri
26 6.1 North Carolina
29 6.2 Washington
30 6.3 Florida
30 6.3 New York
32 6.4 Louisiana
32 6.4 South Carolina
34 6.5 Kentucky
34 6.5 New Mexico
34 6.5 West Virginia
37 6.6 Connecticut
37 6.6 New Jersey
39 6.7 Tennessee
40 6.8 Alabama
40 6.8 Alaska
42 6.9 Arizona
42 6.9 Oregon
44 7.1 Illinois
45 7.2 Georgia
46 7.3 Michigan
47 7.5 California
48 7.7 Rhode Island
49 7.8 Mississippi
49 7.8 Nevada

Highlights

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Unemployment Rate, Annual
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Unemployment Rate, Annual
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Unemployment Rate, Annual
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Overview

Unemployment Rate is the total percentage of the civilian labor force that is unemployed. For most, employment is the source of income for sustaining a healthy life and for accessing health care. For many individuals, their employer is the source of health insurance. The US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics releases unemployment figures monthly and annually. The official definition of the unemployment rate is “total unemployed, as a percent of the civilian labor force” and is the figure most widely published by the media.

Unemployment rate ranges from a low of 2.8% in North Dakota to a high of 7.8% in Nevada, Mississippi and Washington D.C. The national unemployment rate is 6.2%, a decreased from 7.4% in the 2014 Edition.

Public Health Impact

The connection between unemployment and health has been studied extensively, and the existing evidence points to a strong relationship between employment status and both mental and physical health.[1] Unemployment also contributes to poverty, another cause of ill health. Unemployment has been associated with an increase in unhealthy behaviors such as poor diet, lack of exercise, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption.[2] Unemployed workers report more chronic disease and lower levels of physical and mental health.[3]

High rates of unemployment among young adults aged 18 to 24 and emerging young adults aged 16 to 24 is a rising public health concern in the United States.[4] The unemployment rate for young adults has been in or near the double digits since the 1980s and was 14.3% in July 2014.[5] The unemployment rate did not change significantly from 2013 to 2014 for Asians and Hispanic emerging young adult populations.[6] A retrospective analysis of mortality and unemployment among young workers demonstrated a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality, homicide-related mortality, and other-cause mortality for adults aged 18 to 24 who were employed, independent of gender, race, or level of education.[7]

Employer-sponsored health insurance is the most common form of health insurance in the US, and the unemployment rate provides information about the number of uninsured. From 2009 to 2010, 81.4% of employed adults had health insurance compared with only 48.1% of unemployed adults aged 18 to 64 years.[8] A higher proportion of the unemployed insured adults have public insurance.[9]

High unemployment rates increase the economic burden on states due to decreased revenue from income taxes and increased demand for unemployment insurance and social welfare programs.[10] Evidence-based strategies exist to reduce the unemployment rate, especially in the young adult and emerging young adult populations. Programs designed to smooth the school-to-work transition and to develop job mobility are recommended as well as programs that foster the development of skills relevant to the labor market.[11]



[1] Dooley D. Unemployment, underemployment and mental health: conceptualizing employment status as a continuum. Am J Community Psychol. 2003;32(1/2):9-20.

[2] Dooley D, Fielding J, Levi L. Health and unemployment. Annu Rev Public Health. 1996;17:449-65.

[3] Friedland DS. Underemployment: Consequences for the health and well-being of workers. Am J Community Psychol. 2003;32(1/2):33.

[4] McGee RE, Thompson NJ. Unemployment and depression among emerging adults in 12 states, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2010. Prev Chronic Dis 2015;12:140451. http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2015/14_0451.htm. Updated March 19, 2015. Accessed July 31, 2015.

[5] Economic News Release. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment and unemployment among youth summary. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/youth.nr0.htm. Updated August 13, 2014. Accessed July 31, 2015.

[6] Economic News Release. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment and unemployment among youth summary. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/youth.nr0.htm. Updated August 13, 2014. Accessed July 31, 2015.

[7] Davila EP, Christ SL, Martinez AC, et al. Young adults, mortality and employment. J Occup Environ Med. 2010;52(5):501-504.

[8] Driscoll AK, Bernstein AB. Health And Access To Care Among Employed And Unemployed Adults: United States,

2009-2010. NCHS Data Brief, No 83. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2012.

[9] Driscoll AK, Bernstein AB. Health And Access To Care Among Employed And Unemployed Adults: United States,

2009-2010. NCHS Data Brief, No 83. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2012.

[10] Dooley D, Fielding J, Levi L. Health and unemployment. Annu Rev Public Health. 1996;17:449-65.

[11] Youth Employment Programs: An evaluation of World Bank and IFC support. Independent Evaluation Group. 2012.