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Percentage of high school students who self-report smoking cigarettes on at least 1 day during the past 30 days.

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Youth Smoking: Oklahoma

Oklahoma Youth Smoking (2012-2015) see more
  • Percentage of high school students who self-report smoking cigarettes on at least 1 day during the past 30 days.

Youth Smoking

United States Youth Smoking (2012-2015) see more
  • Percentage of high school students who self-report smoking cigarettes on at least 1 day during the past 30 days.

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Overview

Youth Smoking is the percentage of high school youth that smoked cigarettes on at least 1 day during the last 30 days. These data are collected by the CDC through the High School Youth Risk Behavior Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). The survey was only administered in 41 states, so data is not available for all states. These data are from the 2013 YRBSS and match the 2014 Edition.

Youth smoking varies from a low of 4.4% of high school youth in Utah to a high of 19.6% in West Virginia. Nationwide, 15.7% of youth had smoked cigarettes on at least 1 day during the 30 days before the survey. Reducing the national prevalence of adolescents who smoke cigarettes in the past 30 days from 19.5% to 16.0% is a Healthy People 2020 goal.

 

Public Health Impact

Smoking is most commonly associated with negative health effects in adults, but there are immediate effects even in young smokers. Adolescents who smoke are less physically fit and have more respiratory illness than nonsmoking peers.[1] Tobacco exposure during adolescence may also negatively affect brain development and is associated with high-risk sexual activities, alcohol use, and illicit drug use.[2][3] Youth who use multiple tobacco products are at an increased risk of becoming nicotine dependent.[4]

More than 21% of high school students use tobacco.[5] Even though youth smoking rates have declined, the use of other forms of tobacco, namely electronic cigarettes and hookahs, has increased.[6] Electronic cigarettes were the most commonly used tobacco product among high school (13.4%) and middle school (3.9%) students in 2014. The most recent data show no difference in the prevalence of cigarette smoking between males and females, but by race and ethnicity white youth have the highest prevalence of smoking.[7] According to the 2014 report from the Surgeon General, “if current rates continue, 5.6 million Americans younger than 18 years of age who are alive today are projected to die prematurely from smoking-related disease.”

The cost of youth smoking is realized in adulthood with an annual average of $130 billion attributable to direct medical costs and a $150 billion attributable to losses in productivity.[8] Nearly 90% of adult daily smokers report having started before age 18, and nearly 100% of adults who smoke every day started smoking when they were younger than 26 years.[9] Because smoking habits are formed early in life, efforts to reduce smoking rates and deaths in the United States should be focused on the youth population. Smokers who quit smoking before age 35 reduce their risk of premature death to almost the same level as non-smokers.[10] Many varied smoking cessation interventions have been found to be effective at the individual and community levels.[11] A tobacco excise tax creating a high price is an example of a policy approach that is effective at preventing youth from starting smoking and helping current users stop.[12] For more information and resources on prevention and cessation programs for children and adolescents, see www.tobaccofreekids.org.

A Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator is to reduce the use of cigarettes by adolescents 16% in the past month.



[1] US Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences Of Smoking—50 Years Of Progress. Smoking and youth fact sheet. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2014. http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/50th-anniversary/pdfs/fs_smoking_youth_508.pdf

[2] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco use among middle and high school students—United States, 2011–2014. MMWR. 2015;64(14):381-5.

[3] US Department of Health and Human Services. Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012. Accessed July 24, 2015.

[4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco use among middle and high school students—United States, 2011–2014. MMWR. 2015;64(14):381-5.

[5] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Youth tobacco prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/youth/. Updated February 4, 2015. Accessed July 24, 2015.

[6] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco use among middle and high school students—United States, 2011–2014. MMWR. 2015;64(14):381-5.

[7] US Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences Of Smoking—50 Years Of Progress. Patterns of tobacco use among us youth, young adults, and adults. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2014. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/50th-anniversary/index.htm.

[8] US Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences Of Smoking—50 Years Of Progress. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2014. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/50th-anniversary/index.htm.

[9] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Youth tobacco use. http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/youth_data/tobacco_use/index.htm. Updated July 24, 2015. Accessed July 24, 2015.

[10] Taylor Jr. DH, Hasselblad V, Henley SJ, Thun MJ, Sloan FA. Benefits of smoking cessation for longevity. Am J Public Health. 2002;92(6):990-996.

[11] Lemmens V, Oenema A, Knut IK, Brug J. Effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions among adults: a systematic review of reviews. European Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2008;17(6):535.

[12] Chaloupka FJ. Effectiveness of tax and price policies in tobacco control. Tob Control. 2011;20(3):235.