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Percentage of high school students who graduate within 4 years of starting ninth grade with a regular high school diploma.

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High School Graduation: Rhode Island

Rhode Island High School Graduation AFGR (1990-2015) see more
  • Percentage of incoming ninth graders who graduate in 4 years from high school with a regular diploma.
  • Percentage of incoming ninth graders who graduate in four years from high school with a regular diploma.
  • Percentage of high school students who graduate within 4 years of starting ninth grade with a regular high school diploma.

High School Graduation

United States High School Graduation AFGR (1990-2015) see more
  • Percentage of incoming ninth graders who graduate in 4 years from high school with a regular diploma.
  • Percentage of incoming ninth graders who graduate in four years from high school with a regular diploma.
  • Percentage of high school students who graduate within 4 years of starting ninth grade with a regular high school diploma.
Ranking Value State
1 89.7 Iowa
2 88.5 Nebraska
3 88 Texas
3 88 Wisconsin
5 87.5 New Jersey
5 87.5 North Dakota
7 87.3 New Hampshire
8 87 Indiana
9 86.6 Vermont
10 86.4 Maine
11 86.3 Tennessee
12 86.1 Kentucky
13 85.7 Kansas
13 85.7 Missouri
15 85.5 Connecticut
15 85.5 Pennsylvania
17 Idaho
18 85 Maryland
18 85 Massachusetts
20 84.9 Arkansas
21 84.8 Oklahoma
22 84.5 Virginia
23 84.4 Montana
24 83.2 Illinois
25 83 Utah
26 82.7 South Dakota
27 82.5 North Carolina
28 82.4 Hawaii
29 82.2 Ohio
30 81.4 West Virginia
31 80.4 California
31 80.4 Delaware
33 80 Alabama
34 79.8 Minnesota
35 79.7 Rhode Island
36 77.6 South Carolina
37 77 Michigan
37 77 Wyoming
39 76.9 Colorado
40 76.8 New York
41 76.4 Washington
42 75.6 Florida
43 75.5 Mississippi
44 75.1 Arizona
45 73.5 Louisiana
46 71.8 Alaska
47 71.7 Georgia
48 70.7 Nevada
49 70.3 New Mexico
49 68.7 Oregon

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High School Graduation
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High School Graduation
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High School Graduation
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Overview

High School Graduation estimates the percentage of public school students who graduate with a regular high school diploma within 4 years of starting ninth grade. Starting with the 2010-11 school year data collection, the National Center for Education Statistics began estimating the Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate (ACGR) for each state. 

The ACGR is the number of students who graduate in 4 years with a regular high school diploma (the starting cohort) divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the graduating class. The starting cohort is formed by students who are entering the ninth grade (or the earliest high school grade) for the first time, and this cohort is adjusted by adding students who subsequently transfer into the cohort and subtracting students who subsequently transfer out, emigrate, or die over a 4 year period. The 2015 ranks are based on 2012 to 2013 school year data. Data was not available for Idaho and its value was set to maintain the same rank it held in the 2014 edition based on AFGR data. 

The high school graduation rate varies from 89.7% of incoming ninth graders who graduate within 4 years in Iowa to 62.3% in Washington D.C. The national average is 81.4%, compared to 80.0% in the 2014 Edition, an increase in the high school graduation rate of 1.75%.

Public Health Impact

The connection between education and health has been well documented, spans almost all health conditions,[1] and is evidenced by an array of health outcomes. College graduates have an additional 5 years of life expectancy compared with those who did not complete high school. An additional 4 years of education lowers 5-year mortality 1.8% and reduces the risk of heart disease and the risk of diabetes 2.2% and 1.3%, respectively.[2] Individuals with more education are less likely to smoke, drink heavily, or be overweight or obese.[3] For those without a high school education, life expectancy has decreased since the 1990s.[4]

More education leads to better jobs, higher earnings, and more resources to pursue a healthy lifestyle.[5] Education can help facilitate more effective health care as patients are more health literate and better equipped to understand and participate in their care for optimal results.[6] Additional education offers access to healthier food, safer housing and neighborhoods, and jobs with healthier working conditions and perhaps more extensive benefits such as health insurance or paid leave.[7] Increasing educational attainment in a population improves not only the health status of the population as a whole but also of vulnerable populations.[8] Thus, policies aimed at increasing education levels are likely to have extensive, positive population health impacts.[9]

Investing in education leads to cost savings in the health sector. Chronic disease costs drive a majority of Medicaid spending, and chronic disease is typically more prevalent among those with less education.[10] Studies have found that if the health of less educated Americans were on par with the health of college-educated Americans, health improvements would result in savings of more than $1 trillion annually.[11]

Increasing the proportion of students who graduate from high school with a regular diploma 4 years after starting 9th grade is a leading health indicator in Healthy People 2020, with a target to improve rates 10% by 2020.[12]



[1] Ross CE. The links between education and health. Am Sociol Rev. 1995;719.

[2] Cutler D, Lleras-Muney A. Education and health. Policy brief #9. National Poverty Center, 2007; http://www.npc.umich.edu/publications/policy_briefs/brief9/. Accessed July 16, 2015.

[3] Cutler D, Lleras-Muney A.  Education and health. Policy brief #9. National Poverty Center, 2007; http://www.npc.umich.edu/publications/policy_briefs/brief9/. Accessed July 16, 2015.

[4] Center on Society and Health. Education: it matters more to health than ever before. Virginia Commonwealth University and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. January, 2014; http://societyhealth.vcu.edu/media/society-health/pdf/test-folder/CSH-EHI-Issue-Brief-1.pdf

[5] Center on Society and Health. Why education matters to health: exploring the causes. Virginia Commonwealth University and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. April, 2014; http://societyhealth.vcu.edu/media/society-health/pdf/test-folder/CSH-EHI-Issue-Brief-2.pdf

[6] Peerson A. Health literacy revisited: what do we mean and why does it matter? Health Promot Internation. 2009;24(3):285.

[7] Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Why does education matter so much to health? http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2012/12/why-does-education-matter-so-much-to-health-.html. Updated March, 2013.

[8] Lleras-Muney A. The relationship between education and adult mortality in the United States. The Review of Economic Studies. 2005;72(1):189.

[9] Cutler DM, Lleras-Muney A. Education and Health: Evaluating Theories and Evidence. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2006.

[10] Barnes A, Bono R, Kimmel A, Woolf S. Investments in education are investments in health: the state perspective. Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health, in partnership with Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. http://societyhealth.vcu.edu/media/society-health/pdf/EHI4StateBrief.pdf .

[11] Cutler DM, Lleras-Muney A. Education and Health: Evaluating Theories and Evidence. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2006.

[12] Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Health People 2020. http://www.healthypeople.gov/node/3490/objectives#3949. Accessed July 9, 2015.