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Percentage of the population that does not have health insurance privately, through their employer, or the government. (Two year average)

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Lack of Health Insurance: South Carolina

South Carolina Lack of Health Insurance (1990-2014) see more
  • Percentage of the population that does not have health insurance privately, through their employer or the government. Annual rate.
  • Percentage of the population that does not have health insurance privately, through their employer or the government. Annual rate, revised CPS method of estimation.
  • Percentage of the population that does not have health insurance privately, through their employer, or the government. (Two year average)

Lack of Health Insurance

United States Lack of Health Insurance (1990-2014) see more
  • Percentage of the population that does not have health insurance privately, through their employer or the government. Annual rate.
  • Percentage of the population that does not have health insurance privately, through their employer or the government. Annual rate, revised CPS method of estimation.
  • Percentage of the population that does not have health insurance privately, through their employer, or the government. (Two year average)
Ranking Value State
1 3.8 Massachusetts
2 6.8 Hawaii
2 6.8 Vermont
4 8.1 Minnesota
5 8.3 Iowa
6 9.0 Delaware
6 9.0 Wisconsin
8 9.3 Connecticut
9 9.7 Pennsylvania
10 10.2 Maryland
10 10.2 North Dakota
12 10.7 Maine
12 10.7 New Hampshire
14 10.8 New York
15 11.2 Michigan
16 11.3 Nebraska
16 11.3 Ohio
16 11.3 Rhode Island
19 11.4 South Dakota
20 12.4 Kansas
20 12.4 Virginia
22 12.8 Illinois
23 13.0 New Jersey
24 13.3 Missouri
25 13.4 Alabama
26 13.9 Tennessee
26 13.9 Washington
28 14.1 Indiana
28 14.1 Kentucky
30 14.2 Utah
30 14.2 West Virginia
32 14.4 Colorado
32 14.4 Wyoming
34 14.8 Oregon
35 16.1 North Carolina
36 16.2 Arkansas
36 16.2 Idaho
38 16.3 South Carolina
39 16.7 Louisiana
40 17.1 Mississippi
41 17.2 Montana
42 17.3 Arizona
43 17.5 California
44 18.0 Oklahoma
45 18.5 New Mexico
46 18.6 Georgia
47 19.5 Alaska
48 20.0 Florida
49 21.4 Nevada
50 22.3 Texas

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Lack of Health Insurance
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Lack of Health Insurance
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Lack of Health Insurance
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Overview

Lack of Health Insurance is the percentage of the population not covered by private or public health insurance. The 2014 ranks are based on 2012 and 2013 data from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement Bureau of the Current Population Survey.

The prevalence of the population without health insurance ranges from a low of 3.8% in Massachusetts to a high of 22.3% in Texas. Nationally, 14.6% of the US population are uninsured, down from 15.6% in the 2013 Edition.  The data presented in this report was collected before full implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

 

Individuals without health insurance have more difficulty accessing the health care system, are often unable to participate in preventive care programs, and have more unmet health needs.[1] In addition to decreasing quality of life, these unmet health needs can place a substantial burden on the health care system. Over time, unmet health needs can develop into more serious conditions which require more costly treatments. Lack of health insurance often leads to more emergency department visits which can cost up to 10 times more than treatment in a clinic.[2] For these reasons and many more, uninsured individuals have consistently been found to have worse health outcomes.[3] Among the uninsured, preventative health care services are less utilized and cancer mortality rates are higher.[4] Overall, the unmet health needs of the uninsured translate into a 25% greater risk of mortality compared to those with insurance, accounting for an estimated 18,000 excess deaths annually.[5].

The Affordable Care Act marks a major attempt to bring down the uninsured rate through expanded Medicaid eligibility requirements and tax subsidies for individuals in lower income brackets. Early evaluations detect a 5% decrease in unemployment in the second quarter of 2014 – a marked decline less than one year after the initial enrollment period.[1] This decline in uninsurance corresponded with improvements in access measures, including the percentage of adults with a personal doctor and the proportion of adults not able to afford medical care. [6]

 

The Healthy People 2020 access to health services leading health indicator target is to increase the proportion of persons with medical insurance to 100 percent.



[1] Ayanian JZ. Unmet health needs of uninsured adults in the United States. JAMA. 2000;284(16):2061.

[2] Newton MF. Uninsured adults presenting to US emergency departments. JAMA. 2008;300(16):1914.

[3] Freeman JD. The causal effect of health insurance on utilization and outcomes in adults: A systematic review of US studies. Med Care. 2008;46(10):1023.

[4] Ward E. Association of insurance with cancer care utilization and outcomes. Ca. 2008;58(1):9.

[5] Ayanian JZ. Unmet health needs of uninsured adults in the United States. JAMA. 2000;284(16):2061.

[6] Peters A. Increased particulate air pollution and the triggering of myocardial infarction. Circulation. 2001;103(23):2810.