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Number of primary care physicians (including general practice, family practice, OB-GYN, pediatrics, and internal medicine) per 100,000 population.

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Primary Care Physicians: South Carolina

South Carolina Primary Care Physicians (2005-2014) see more
  • Number of primary care physicians (including general practice, family practice, OB-GYN, pediatrics, and internal medicine) per 100,000 population.

Primary Care Physicians

United States Primary Care Physicians (2005-2014) see more
  • Number of primary care physicians (including general practice, family practice, OB-GYN, pediatrics, and internal medicine) per 100,000 population.
Ranking Value State
1 200.8 Massachusetts
2 178.5 Maryland
3 177 Rhode Island
4 170.9 Vermont
5 167.3 New York
6 166.7 Connecticut
7 145.2 Minnesota
8 143.7 New Jersey
9 140.2 Hawaii
10 135.7 New Hampshire
11 133.9 Illinois
12 131.5 Oregon
13 130.3 Pennsylvania
14 130.2 Maine
15 126.7 Washington
16 125.8 Virginia
17 125 Ohio
17 125 Wisconsin
19 124.4 Tennessee
20 123.7 Louisiana
21 123.6 North Dakota
22 122.2 California
22 122.2 Michigan
24 120.7 Colorado
25 118.5 Nebraska
26 117.9 North Carolina
27 115.6 New Mexico
28 113.5 South Dakota
29 113.2 Alaska
30 112.8 Delaware
31 111.8 Missouri
32 110 Florida
33 107.9 South Carolina
34 107.8 West Virginia
35 106.6 Kansas
36 105.4 Georgia
37 104.2 Indiana
38 103 Kentucky
39 102.6 Arkansas
40 101.9 Alabama
41 99.7 Montana
42 98.8 Texas
43 98.4 Arizona
44 90.8 Utah
45 90 Wyoming
46 85.7 Iowa
47 85.3 Nevada
48 84.8 Oklahoma
49 81.8 Mississippi
50 80.1 Idaho

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Overview

Primary Care Physicians is a measure of access to primary care for the general population as measured by the number of primary care physicians per 100,000 population. Primary care physicians include all those who identify themselves as Family Practice physicians, General Practitioners, Internists, Pediatricians, Obstetricians, or Gynecologists. The 2014 ranks are based on 2012 data from the American Medical Association’s publication Physician Characteristics and Distribution in the United States, 2014 Edition. Data used with permission.

Primary care physicians range from 200.8 physicians per 100,000 population in Massachusetts to 80.1 physicians per 100,000 population in Idaho. The national average is 123.5 primary care physicians per 100,000 population, essentially unchanged in the last few years. 

 

The number of primary care physicians is a measure of the availability of health care. Primary care physicians provide direct patient care and counsel patients in the appropriate use of specialists and advanced treatment options. Primary care physicians are typically the first point of contact within the health care system for patients and provide critical preventative care, ongoing care, and referrals to specialists. The availability of primary care physicians has a documented influence on health, as greater numbers of primary care physicians have been linked to better health outcomes including lower rates of low birthweight, lower all cause mortality, and longer life spans.[1] Racial and socioeconomic disparities have been documented in access to primary care physicians, implying a potential mechanism for disparities in downstream health outcomes.[2] The number of primary care physicians per 100,000 people is constantly changing due to evolving state populations, physician retirements, new physicians, and physicians moving between states and specialties.

Healthy People 2020 objectives related to primary care physicians include increasing the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider and increasing the number of practicing primary care providers.



[1] Starfield B. Contribution of primary care to health systems and health. Milbank Q. 2005;83(3):457.

[2] Shi L, Chen CC, Nie X, Zhu J, Hu R. Racial and socioeconomic disparities in access to primary care among people with chronic conditions. J Am Board Fam Med. 2014;27(2):189-198.