View

Number of primary care physicians (including general practice, family practice, OB-GYN, pediatrics, and internal medicine) per 100,000 population.

Trend

History

Primary Care Physicians: South Carolina

South Carolina Primary Care Physicians (2005-2013) see more
  • Number of primary care physicians (including general practice, family practice, OB-GYN, pediatrics, and internal medicine) per 100,000 population.

Primary Care Physicians

United States Primary Care Physicians (2005-2013) see more
  • Number of primary care physicians (including general practice, family practice, OB-GYN, pediatrics, and internal medicine) per 100,000 population.

Highlights

Explore the Data

Core Measure Impact Related Measures Thematic Map
Core Measure Impact
Primary Care Physicians
Loading...
Related Measures
Primary Care Physicians
Loading...
Thematic Map
Primary Care Physicians
Loading...

Overview

Primary Care Physicians is a measure of access to primary care for the general population as measured by the number of primary care physicians per 100,000 population. Primary care physicians include all those who identify themselves as Family Practice physicians, General Practitioners, Internists, Pediatricians, Obstetricians, or Gynecologists. The 2013 ranks are based on 2011 data from the American Medical Association’s publication Physician Characteristics and Distribution in the United States, 2013 Edition. Data used with permission.

The number of primary care physicians is a measure of the availability of health care. Primary care physicians provide direct patient care and, as necessary, counsel patients in the appropriate use of specialists and advanced treatment options. Primary care physicians are often the first point of contact within the health care system for patients and provide critical preventative care, ongoing care, and referrals to specialists. The availability of primary care physicians has a documented influence on health, as greater numbers of primary care physicians have been linked to better health outcomes including lower rates of low birthweight, lower all cause mortality, and longer life spans.[1] The number of primary care physicians per 100,000 people is constantly changing due to evolving state populations, physician retirements, new physicians, and physicians moving between states and specialties.

Primary care physicians range from 196 physicians per 100,000 population in Massachusetts to 78 physicians per 100,000 population in Idaho. The national average is 121 primary care physicians per 100,000 population, essentially unchanged in the last few years. Healthy People 2020 objectives related to primary care physicians include increasing the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider and increasing the number of practicing primary care providers.

 

 


[1] Starfield B. Contribution of primary care to health systems and health. Milbank Q. 2005;83(3):457.