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Number of years of potential life lost prior to age 75 per 100,000 population.

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Premature Death: South Carolina

South Carolina Premature Death (1990-2015) see more
  • Number of years of potential life lost prior to age 75 per 100,000 population.

Premature Death

United States Premature Death (1990-2015) see more
  • Number of years of potential life lost prior to age 75 per 100,000 population.
Ranking Value State
1 5414 Minnesota
2 5468 Massachusetts
3 5573 Connecticut
4 5609 California
5 5714 New York
6 5809 New Hampshire
7 5819 New Jersey
8 5835 Washington
9 5958 Vermont
10 5982 Colorado
11 6047 Hawaii
12 6125 Nebraska
13 6157 Utah
14 6252 Iowa
15 6308 Rhode Island
16 6319 Oregon
17 6365 Wisconsin
18 6435 Virginia
19 6555 Illinois
20 6729 Maine
21 6747 Idaho
22 6780 Maryland
23 6913 South Dakota
24 7059 Florida
25 7084 Texas
26 7098 North Dakota
27 7110 Kansas
28 7164 Arizona
29 7204 Pennsylvania
30 7320 Wyoming
31 7497 Nevada
32 7509 Delaware
33 7604 North Carolina
34 7618 Michigan
35 7673 Montana
36 7758 Alaska
37 7880 Georgia
38 7991 Ohio
39 8117 Missouri
40 8129 Indiana
41 8190 New Mexico
42 8592 South Carolina
43 9088 Tennessee
44 9110 Kentucky
45 9586 Arkansas
46 9799 Oklahoma
47 9957 Louisiana
48 10095 Alabama
49 10129 West Virginia
50 10744 Mississippi

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Premature Death
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Overview

Premature Death is the age-adjusted loss of years of life due to death before age 75, [1] or YPLL-75. For example, the death of a 25-year-old would account for 50 years of lost life, while the death of a 60-year-old would account for 15 years. The 2015 ranks are based on 2013 mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Premature death varies from a low of 5,414 years lost per 100,000 population in Minnesota to over 10,000 years lost per 100,000 population in Mississippi, West Virginia, and Alabama. Nationally, 6,997 years were lost before the age of 75 per 100,000 population. Premature death has declined since the 1990 Edition, from 8,716 years lost before age 75 per 100,000 population to the current rate.

Public Health Impact

Premature death is a measure reflecting age of death for persons younger than 75 years of age. Someone dying young causes the measure’s value to increase more than someone dying closer to age 75. Young people’s deaths are more likely to be preventable than seniors’ deaths and often indicate health care system failures and/or lifestyle factors. Heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, suicide, and perinatal deaths are the US’s top 5 causes of premature death[1] —and many are preventable through lifestyle modifications. Lung cancer is the largest contributor to premature cancer deaths, and smoking cessation greatly decreases the risk of lung cancer. Smoking begins young as 88% of adult smokers began by age 18.[2] Smoking decreases life expectancy by at least 10 years compared with nonsmokers.[3] Premature deaths between 2000 and 2004 attributed to smoking equal 443,000, resulting in $96.8 billion lost productivity costs.[4]

Heart disease is tied to several modifiable risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, and physical inactivity. More than 1 in 3 children are obese or overweight, and 70% of obese children have at least 1 risk factor for heart disease.[5] Childhood obesity costs an estimated $14.2 billion annually; this figure includes inpatient and outpatient visits and annual prescription drug costs.[6] When including the indirect costs such as managing adult obesity-related diseases, the costs reach $147 billion annually.[7]

Violence is the 3rd-leading cause of death of young people aged 15 to 24; 4,787 youths aged 10 to 24 were victims of homicide in 2012.[8] Injuries due to youth violence burden the medical system and economy, and they have an impact on premature deaths. Among high school students, 1 in 4 have been in a physical fight in the last year.[9] Youth homicide and injuries result in an estimated $16 billion in medical and productivity losses annually.[10] Violence also affects the surrounding communities, increasing health care costs, lowering property values, and disrupting social services.[11]

Risks for unintentional injuries include not wearing seatbelts and motorcycle helmets, occupational hazards, drug abuse, unsafe consumer products, and environmental factors.[12] Motorcyclists are 30 times more likely to die in an accident and 5 times more likely to get injured than someone occupying a vehicle. Motorcycle accidents resulted in $12.9 billion in costs and an additional $66 billion in societal harm; these costs are disproportionately due to fatalities and injuries compared with other vehicle accidents.[13] Intervention strategies that encourage healthy lifestyles and preventive care can be effective in decreasing premature death.

 


[1] CDC/National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC). WISQARS Years of Potential Life Lost (YPLL) Report. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, NCIPC. 2009.

[2] Surgeon General. Preventing tobacco use among youth and young adults: a report of the surgeon general, 2012. http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/preventing-youth-tobacco-use/. Accessed July 29, 2015.

[3] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco-related mortality. http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/tobacco_related_mortality/. February 2014. Accessed July 29, 2015.

[4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking-attributable mortality, years of potential life lost, and productivity losses-United States, 2000-2004. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5745a3.htm. November 13, 2008. Accessed August 5, 2015.

[5] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Childhood obesity facts. http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/facts.htm. April 2015. Accessed Jul 29, 2015.

[6] Cawley J. The economics of childhood obesity. Health Affairs. 2010;29(3):364-371.

[7] Cawley J. The economics of childhood obesity. Health Affairs. 2010;29(3):364-371.

[8]  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web-based injury statistics query and reporting system (WISQARS) 2012. www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars. Accessed August 5, 2015.

[9] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Youth risk behavior surveillance-United States, 2013. MMWR, Surveillance Summaries. 2014;61(no.SS-4). http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss6104a1.htm?s_cid=ss6104a1_w. Accessed August 5, 2015.

[10]  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web-based injury statistics query and reporting system (WISQARS) 2012. www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars. Accessed August 5, 2015.

[11] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Understanding youth violence, 2015. http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/yv-factsheet-a.pdf . Accessed August 5, 2015.

[12] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Up to 40 percent of annual deaths from each of five leadings US causes are preventable. http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0501-preventable-deaths.html. May 2014. Accessed July 30, 2015.

[13] Blincoe LJ, Miller TR, Zaloshnja E, Lawrence BA. The economic and societal impact of motor vehicle crashes, 2010. Revised Report No. DOT HS 812 013. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. May 2015.