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Number of births per 1,000 females aged 15 to 19 years.

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Teen Birth Rate: Tennessee

Tennessee Teen Birth Rate (1993-2015) see more
  • Number of births per 1,000 females aged 15 to 19 years.

Teen Birth Rate

United States Teen Birth Rate (1993-2015) see more
  • Number of births per 1,000 females aged 15 to 19 years.
Ranking Value State
1 12.1 Massachusetts
2 12.6 New Hampshire
3 12.9 Connecticut
4 14.5 Vermont
5 14.8 New Jersey
6 16.8 Minnesota
7 17.4 Maine
8 17.7 New York
8 17.7 Rhode Island
10 19.4 Maryland
11 19.6 Wisconsin
12 20.1 Virginia
13 20.5 Washington
14 20.6 Utah
15 20.9 Pennsylvania
16 21.6 Oregon
17 22.1 Iowa
18 23.4 Colorado
19 23.6 California
19 23.6 Michigan
21 24.1 North Dakota
22 24.6 Florida
22 24.6 Illinois
24 24.7 Delaware
25 24.9 Nebraska
26 25.1 Hawaii
27 25.7 Idaho
28 27.2 Ohio
29 27.9 Montana
30 28.4 North Carolina
31 29.1 South Dakota
32 29.6 Kansas
32 29.6 Wyoming
34 30 Missouri
35 30.3 Alaska
35 30.3 Indiana
35 30.3 Nevada
38 30.5 Georgia
39 31.6 South Carolina
40 33.1 Arizona
41 34.3 Alabama
42 34.7 Tennessee
43 39.2 Louisiana
44 39.5 Kentucky
45 40.1 West Virginia
46 41 Texas
47 42.6 Mississippi
48 42.9 Oklahoma
49 43.3 New Mexico
50 43.5 Arkansas

Highlights

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Teen Birth Rate
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Teen Birth Rate
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Teen Birth Rate
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Overview

Teen Birth Rate is the number of births per 1,000 mothers aged 15 to 19 years. The 2015 ranks are based on 2013 birth certificate data from the National Vital Statistics System, CDC. 

Teen birth rates are lowest in Massachusetts at 12.1 births per 1,000 mothers aged 15 to 19 years and highest in Arkansas at 43.5 births per 1,000 mothers aged 15 to 19 years. The national rate is 26.5 births per 1,000 mothers aged 15 to 19 years.

 

Public Health Impact

Prevention of teen and unplanned pregnancy is an important part of a healthy community. There are substantial health, social, and economic costs associated with teen pregnancy and childbearing. Teen mothers are more likely to drop out of high school and face unemployment; their children are more likely to have worse educational, behavioral, and health outcomes than children born to older parents.[1] Fortunately, teen birth rate has declined 57% since 1991 and hit a US historic low in 2013 at 26.5 births per 1,000 teenagers aged 15 to 19 and 0.3 births per 1,000 aged 10 to 14.[2] Birth rates in 2013 dropped to 12.3 per 1,000 (down 13% since 1991) for ages 15 to 17 and to 47.1 per 1,000 (down 8%) for ages 18 to 19.[3] The decline in birth rates among all age groups from 2012 to 2013 was greatest in non-Hispanic blacks and American Indian Alaskan Native teenagers (11%) followed by Hispanic and Asian Pacific Islander teenagers (10%).[4] Despite these declines, the teen birth rates for Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks remain 2 times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic whites.[5]

Multiple studies have attempted to explain the downward trend in the teen birth rate over the last 3 decades. A review of data from 13 studies indicates that state policies supporting family planning and education are associated with lowered teen birth rates. However, evidence for state policies related to public assistance, access to abortion clinics, and public school sex education is inconclusive and contradicting.[6] Data also indicate that the drop in teen birth rates is not a result of increased reliance on abortion; in fact, teen abortion rates fell during this period.[7] In addition, there is evidence that the drop is due to reduced sexual activity and increased contraception use in teens.[8] An analysis in the Journal of Health Economics in 2015 found no association between state-level policies and teen birth rates. At the federal level, the combined effect of the expansion of family planning services under Medicaid and the decrease in welfare benefits accounted for only 12.6% of the downward trend; higher unemployment rates accounted for 16% of the trend.

An example of a state intervention is Colorado’s Family Planning Initiative. Colorado initiated in 2009 this $23 million program using long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) over 7 years to prevent unwanted pregnancies.[9] An analysis of this program’s effects showed a 5% reduction in teen birth rates from 2009 to 2012. Additional studies are needed to strengthen existing research.

The CDC estimates that teen pregnancy and childbirth accounted for $9.4 billion in increased health care and foster care costs in 2010 due to “increased incarceration rates among children of teen parents, and lost tax revenue because of lower educational attainment and income among teen mothers.”  The CDC is focusing teen pregnancy-prevention efforts in minority communities facing the most significant health disparities.[10] One of the Family Planning Healthy People 2020 objectives is to reduce the rate of pregnancies in adolescent females.



[1] Hoffman, SD, Maynard, RA. Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of Teen Pregnancy. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press; 2008.

[2] Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, et al. Births: final data for 2013. National Vital Statistics Reports. 2015; 64(1).

[3] Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, et al. Births: final data for 2013. National Vital Statistics Reports. 2015; 64(1).

[4] Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, et al. Births: final data for 2013. National Vital Statistics Reports. 2015; 64(1).

[5] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Teen pregnancy in the United States. http://www.cdc.gov/teenpregnancy/about/index.htm. Updated May 19, 2015. Accessed July 23, 2015.

[6] Beltz MA, Sacks VH, Moore KA, et al. State policy and teen childbearing: a review of research studies. Journal of Adolescent Health. 2015;56(130):e138.

[7] Kearney MS, Levine, PB. Investigating recent trends in the U.S. teen birth rate. Journal of Health Economics. 2015;41:15-29.

[8] Kearney MS, Levine, PB. Investigating recent trends in the U.S. teen birth rate. Journal of Health Economics. 2015;41:15-29.

[9] Lindo JM, Packham A. How much can expanding access to long-acting reversible contraceptives reduce teen birth rates? National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper Series. 2015. http://www.nber.org/papers/w21275.

[10] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Teen pregnancy in the United States. http://www.cdc.gov/teenpregnancy/about/index.htm. Updated May 19, 2015. Accessed July 23, 2015.