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Number of deaths due to cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, per 100,000 population.

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Cardiovascular Deaths: Vermont

Vermont Cardiovascular Deaths (1990-2015) see more
  • Number of deaths due to cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, per 100,000 population.

Cardiovascular Deaths

United States Cardiovascular Deaths (1990-2015) see more
  • Number of deaths due to cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, per 100,000 population.
Ranking Value State
1 186.5 Minnesota
2 196.2 Colorado
3 203 Hawaii
4 205.6 Massachusetts
5 212 Oregon
6 212.9 Washington
7 213.3 New Hampshire
8 214.9 Alaska
9 216.3 New Mexico
10 216.6 Arizona
11 217.5 Connecticut
12 218.7 Maine
13 218.8 Utah
14 220.3 Vermont
15 221 Florida
16 224.7 Nebraska
17 224.8 North Dakota
18 227.6 Montana
19 227.7 Idaho
20 229.9 Rhode Island
21 231 Wyoming
22 232.5 South Dakota
23 233.6 California
24 237.2 Wisconsin
25 239.1 Virginia
26 245.2 Kansas
27 245.4 Iowa
28 245.6 Delaware
29 245.9 New Jersey
30 250.1 Maryland
31 251.1 North Carolina
32 253.1 Illinois
33 253.5 Texas
34 258.5 New York
35 260.3 Pennsylvania
36 269.8 Georgia
37 271.8 South Carolina
38 274.8 Nevada
39 275.1 Indiana
40 276.1 Ohio
41 281.4 Missouri
42 284.3 Michigan
43 298.1 Kentucky
44 299 Tennessee
45 299.6 West Virginia
46 306.3 Louisiana
47 313.4 Arkansas
48 322.5 Oklahoma
49 330.1 Alabama
50 344.5 Mississippi

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Cardiovascular Deaths
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Cardiovascular Deaths
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Overview

Cardiovascular Deaths is the age-adjusted 3-year average number of deaths attributed to cardiovascular diseases, including but not limited to heart disease and stroke, per 100,000 population. The 2015 ranks are based on 2011 to 2013 data from the National Center for Health Statistics. The rates are age-adjusted using the non-standard 2012 Census population estimates. The following ICD-10 codes were used: I10-I15 (Hypertensive diseases); I20-I25 (Ischaemic heart diseases); I26-I28 (Pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation); I30-I51 (other forms of heart disease); I60-I69 (cerebrovascular diseases); I70-I78 (Diseases of arteries, arterioles, and capillaries); I80-I89 (Diseases of veins, lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes, not elsewhere classified); and I95-I99 (Other and unspecified disorders of the circulatory system).

Deaths from cardiovascular disease vary from a low of 186.5 deaths per 100,000 population in Minnesota to 344.5 deaths per 100,000 population in Mississippi. The national average is 250.8 deaths per 100,000 population. Reducing coronary heart disease deaths and stroke deaths are Healthy People 2020 objectives.

Public Health Impact

Heart disease and stroke are the US’s leading and 5th-leading causes of death, respectively.[1] Heart disease causes 1 in 4 deaths.[2] Heart attacks and strokes are also leading causes of disability in the US with 85.6 million people living with cardiovascular disease or the effects of stroke.[3],[4]Among stroke victims, 90% have residual disability contributing to direct medical costs and lost productivity.[5] Heart disease is the leading cause of death for US adults of all races, ages, and income levels. However, disparities exist. Black adults are twice as likely to have a stroke and more likely to die from stroke than white adults,[6] and 36% of American Indian and Alaska Natives experience cardiovascular death before age 65—more than twice the national rate of 17%.[7] Black men are 30% more likely to experience cardiovascular death than white men. All blacks are 40% more likely to have high blood pressure and less likely to have it controlled. Low-income adults are at higher risk of having a heart attack or stroke and of developing high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Approximately 150,000 cardiovascular deaths were among adults under age 65 in 2009.[8]

Many deaths attributable to heart disease and stroke could be prevented through timely and effective medical care that addresses risk factors and through addressing social determinants of health.[9] The disparity in preventable deaths from heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive diseases among blacks and whites is associated with differences in education, income, housing and built environment, and access to health care.[10] Non-Hispanic blacks have nearly twice the rate of avoidable deaths from heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive disease as non-Hispanic whites.[11] Interventions to reduce state-level differences in avoidable deaths should target states with the highest avoidable death rates and focus on improving access to quality health care and changing the built environment to facilitate better lifestyle choices.[12]

Cardiovascular disease is influenced by such modifiable risk factors as smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, and poor diet.[13] Influencing 1 or more of these risk factors can greatly decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease. An initiative to reduce this burden, Million Hearts, aims to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.[14]

Cardiovascular disease accounts for 17% of medical spending and 30% of Medicare spending,[15] totaling more than $300 billion annually in direct medical costs.[16] The projected direct and indirect costs of cardiovascular disease are projected to exceed $1 trillion annually by 2030.[17]

Two of Healthy People 2020s 25 objectives related to cardiovascular disease focus on the goal of reducing coronary heart disease deaths to 103.4 per 100,000 and stroke deaths to 34.8 per 100,000.



[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Leading causes of death. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm. Updated February 2015. Accessed July 29. 2015.

[2] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heart disease facts. http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm. Updated February 2015. Accessed July 29. 2015.

[3] Million Hearts. 2011. About heart disease & stroke. http://millionhearts.hhs.gov/abouthds/cost-consequences.html. Accessed July 29, 2015.

[4] Mozaffarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics, at a glance. https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/ahamah-public/@wcm/@sop/@smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_470704.pdf. Updated December 2014. Accessed July 29, 2015.

[5] American Heart Association. Cost to treat stroke in America may double by 2030. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/costs-to-treat-stroke-in-america-may-double-by-2030. Updated May 22, 2013. Accessed July 29, 2015.

[6]  Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics–2009 Update: A report from the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Circulation. 2008.

[7] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Disparities in premature deaths from heart disease, 2001. MMWR 53(6):121-125.

[8] Million Hearts. 2011. About heart disease & stroke. http://millionhearts.hhs.gov/abouthds/cost-consequences.html. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[9]  Vital Signs: avoidable deaths from heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive disease—United States, 2001-2010. MMWR 2013;62(35):721-727.

[10]  Vital Signs: avoidable deaths from heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive disease—United States, 2001-2010. MMWR 2013;62(35):721-727.

[11]  Vital Signs: avoidable deaths from heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive disease—United States, 2001-2010. MMWR 2013;62(35):721-727.

[12] Vital Signs: avoidable deaths from heart disease, stroke, and hypertensive disease—United States, 2001-2010. MMWR 2013;62(35):721-727.

[13] Jackson, R. Guidelines on preventing cardiovascular disease in clinical practice. British Medical Journal. 320.7236 (2000):659.

[14] Frieden TR, Berwick DM. The “Million Hearts” initiative—preventing heart attacks and strokes. N Engl J Med, 2011;365(13) e27. doi:10.1056/NEJMp1110421.

[15] National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. 2012 fact book. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook/chapter4.htm#4_7. Accessed July 9, 2014.

[16] US Department of Health and Human Services. About heart disease and stroke. http://millionhearts.hhs.gov/abouthds/cost-consequences.html. Accessed July 15, 2015.

[17] Heidenreich PA, Trogdon JG, Khavjou OA, et al. Forecasting the future of cardiovascular disease in the United States: a policy statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2011;123(8):933-944.