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Number of deaths due to all causes of cancer per 100,000 population.

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Cancer Deaths: Vermont

Vermont Cancer Deaths (1990-2015) see more
  • Number of deaths due to all causes of cancer per 100,000 population.

Cancer Deaths

United States Cancer Deaths (1990-2015) see more
  • Number of deaths due to all causes of cancer per 100,000 population.
Ranking Value State
1 146.1 Utah
2 155.4 Hawaii
3 162.2 Colorado
4 167.3 New Mexico
5 169.6 Arizona
6 170.1 California
7 174.6 Connecticut
7 174.6 Wyoming
9 175.8 Idaho
10 176 North Dakota
11 179.5 Minnesota
12 179.9 New York
13 180.1 Montana
14 182 Florida
15 182.3 Texas
16 182.8 Washington
17 183.6 New Jersey
18 184.8 South Dakota
19 185.4 Nebraska
20 185.6 Massachusetts
21 188 Maryland
22 188.1 Nevada
23 189.2 Virginia
24 190.8 New Hampshire
25 191 Kansas
25 191 Vermont
27 192.1 Oregon
28 192.4 Rhode Island
29 192.8 Georgia
30 193.3 Wisconsin
31 193.7 Iowa
32 194.1 Alaska
33 195.2 North Carolina
34 198.6 Illinois
35 198.7 Michigan
36 199.1 Delaware
37 199.6 Pennsylvania
38 203.2 South Carolina
39 204.3 Maine
40 206.3 Missouri
41 207.6 Ohio
42 208.8 Indiana
43 211.6 Alabama
44 213.7 Tennessee
45 215.8 Oklahoma
46 216.9 Arkansas
47 217.9 Louisiana
48 221.6 West Virginia
49 225.8 Mississippi
50 228.8 Kentucky

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Disparities
Cancer Deaths
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Core Measure Impact
Cancer Deaths
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Related Measures
Cancer Deaths
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Thematic Map
Cancer Deaths
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Overview

Cancer Deaths is the 3-year average, age-adjusted number of deaths attributed to cancer per 100,000 population. The 2015 ranks are based on 2011 to 2013 multiple cause of death data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The rates are age-adjusted using the non-standard 2012 Census population estimates. The following ICD-10 codes were used: C00-C97 (Malignant neoplasms); D00-D09 (In situ neoplasms); and D37-D48 (Neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behavior).

Cancer mortality varies from a low of 146.1 cancer deaths per 100,000 population in Utah to 228.8 deaths per 100,000 population in Kentucky. The national average is 189.6 deaths per 100,000 population, a decrease of 0.3 deaths per 100,000 population from the 2014 Edition. Cancer deaths peaked in 1996 when the national rate was 205.5 deaths per 100,000 population.

Public Health Impact

Cancer is the 2nd-leading cause of death in the US.[1] More than 1.6 million new cases of cancer[2] and 585,000 cancer deaths occur annually.[3] The direct medical cancer costs were $88.7 billion in 2011.[4] In 2011 the most common cancer sites among US adults were prostate, breast, and lung.[5] Prostate cancer is the most common cancer location for US adult men; there were 209,292 diagnoses and 27,970 deaths in 2011.[6] Prostate cancer disproportionately affects black men, who are 1.6 times more likely to be diagnosed and have a 2.4 times greater mortality risk.[7] Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among adult women, with 220,097 women diagnosed and 40,931 deaths in 2011.[8] The highest incidence of breast cancer is found among white women; however, the mortality risk is 44% greater for black women.[9],[10] The US Preventive Services recommends biennial mammograms for women aged 50 to 75 years.[11]

Some types of cancer may be preventable through vaccinations, screening, or early detection. Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes 91% of anal and cervical cancer, 75% of vaginal cancer, 69% of vulvar cancer, and 63% of penile cancers.[12] Three HPV vaccines are available to protect against these cancers and genital warts.[13] The HPV vaccine is recommended for children aged 11 or 12 but is available to women up to age 26 and men up to age 21.[14] In addition, the vaccine is recommended for men who have sex with men and men with compromised immune systems through age 26.[15]

Other cancers are preventable through lifestyle choices. Cigarette smoking causes 90% of lung cancer;[16] lung cancer represents 27% of cancer deaths.[17] An estimated 7,300 people die from lung cancer caused by secondhand smoke annually. Quitting smoking at any age will lower the risk of developing lung cancer.[18] The World Cancer Research estimates 25% to 33% of new cancer cases are related to obesity, physical activity, and nutrition.[19] Obesity is related to several cancers including esophagus, pancreas, colon and rectum, breast, endometrium, kidney, thyroid, and gallbladder.[20] If every US adult lost 2.2 pounds, it would prevent 100,000 new cancer cases annually.[21] More information on the US cancer burden can be found on the CDC’s cancer page.

Healthy People 2020’s target is to reduce cancer mortality to 160.6 deaths per 100,000 population.



[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Leading causes of death. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm. February 6. 2015. Accessed July 15, 2015.

[2] American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2013. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2013.

[3] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cancer. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/cancer.htm. April 29, 2015. Accessed July 15, 2015

[4] American Cancer Society. Economic impact of cancer. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancerbasics/economic-impact-of-cancer. February 06, 2015. Accessed July 15, 2015.

[5] US Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2011 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute; 2014.

[6] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prostate cancer statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/prostate/statistics/index.htm. September 2, 2014. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[7] Zenka, D. African Americans: at higher risk for prostate cancer. http://www.pcf.org/site/c.leJRIROrEpH/b.8368629/k.D6C1/African_Americans_At_Higher_Risk_for_Prostate_Cancer.htm. October 5, 2012. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[8] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Breast cancer rates by race and ethnicity. http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/race.htm. August 27, 2014. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[9] Centers for Disease Control. Breast cancer statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/index.htm. September 2, 2014. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[10] Susan G. Koman. Disparities in breast cancer screening. http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/DisparitiesInBreastCancerScreening.html. June 30, 2015. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[11] US Preventive Services Task Force. Breast cancer screening. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/breast-cancer-screening. July 2015. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[12] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV-associated cancer statistics. http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/hpv/statistics/index.htm. September 2, 2014. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[13] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV vaccines. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/vaccine.html. Updated January 26, 2015. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[14] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV vaccines. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/vaccine.html. Updated January 26, 2015. Accessed July 17, 2015.

[15] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV vaccines. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/vaccine.html. Updated January 26, 2015. Accessed July 17, 2015.

[16] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What are the risk factors for lung cancer? http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm. Updated May 6, 2014. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[17] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Basic information about lung cancer. http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/index.htm. Updated October 14, 2014. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[18] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What are the risk factors for lung cancer? http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm. Updated May 6, 2014. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[19] American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2013. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2013.

[20] National Cancer Institute. Obesity and cancer risk. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/obesity-fact-sheet#q3. January 3, 2012. Accessed August 4, 2015.

[21] National Cancer Institute. Obesity and cancer risk. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/obesity-fact-sheet#q3. January 3, 2012. Accessed August 4, 2015.