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Vermont
Infectious Disease
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Related Measures

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Infectious Disease measures the combined incidence of measles, pertussis, Hepatitis A and syphilis per 100,000 population. Two-year averages are used to calculate the incidence rates. This definition was changed in 2011 from the previous editions, where infectious disease was defined as the combined incidence of AIDS, TB, and hepatitis A and B, and three-year averages were used. The ranks are based on data from two and three years prior from the CDC’s Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Reports.

 

In the early 1900s, the field of public health was focused on combating infectious diseases caused by poor sanitation and poor hygiene. Many great achievements were made in this area through vaccinations, antibiotics, and education. It has only been since the mid-1900s that the field of public health shifted its focus from infectious diseases like cholera and smallpox to chronic diseases like diabetes and cancer.[1] Despite the current focus on chronic diseases, infectious diseases still pose a threat and are responsible for a significant burden on our nation’s health. The incidence of these infectious diseases is an indication of the toll that largely preventable diseases are placing on the population. Infectious diseases pose a threat to all members of a population, but can be especially severe in young children and the elderly, leading to hospitalizations or even death.[2]

The 4 diseases included in this measure were chosen partially because they represent different transmission mechanisms and therefore different prevention and treatment options. Measles and pertussis are both airborne, hepatitis A is generally spread through food, and syphilis is sexually transmitted. Transmission of measles, pertussis and hepatitis A can be reduced through vaccinations. The incidence of these diseases provides information not only about the immunization rate in a community but also information about the ability of a system to prevent, detect, and control outbreaks. Proper handwashing is a simple yet effective way to prevent many infectious diseases including hepatitis A, measles, and pertussis. Safe cooking practices can prevent most, if not all, foodborne infection including hepatitis A. Condom usage and other safe sex practices can help prevent sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis. A high incidence of infectious disease may be indicative of a need for greater investment in public health prevention measures. Immunizations and early interventions have proven effective in keeping infectious disease rates at a minimum.

 


[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Achievements in public health, 1900-1999: Changes in the public health system. MMWR - Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report. December 24, 1999;48(50):1141-7. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4850a1.htm. Accessed September 24, 2012.

[2] Armstrong GL. Trends in infectious disease mortality in the United States during the 20th century. JAMA. 1999;281(1):61.

 

VT Infectious Disease (1990-2012) see more
  • Number of AIDS, tuberculosis and Hepatitis (A and B) cases reported to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention per 100,000 population. Two year average.
  • Number of reported measles, pertussis, syphilis and Hepatitis A cases per 100,000 population. Two year average.

The measures tracked by America's Health Rankings are those actions that can affect the future health of the population. For a state to improve the health of its population, efforts must focus on these measures, these determinants of health.

STATE RANKINGS

State Changes
Over Time
Rank Value Take Action
1990 - Vermont graph 13 20.3 View Actions
1991 - Vermont graph 13 23.0 View Actions
1992 - Vermont graph 12 21.4 View Actions
1993 - Vermont graph 9 19.7 View Actions
1994 - Vermont graph 5 15.2 View Actions
1995 - Vermont graph 3 14.0 View Actions
1996 - Vermont graph 3 12.4 View Actions
1997 - Vermont graph 2 12.7 View Actions
1998 - Vermont graph 5 13.1 View Actions
1998 - Vermont graph 40 32.5 View Actions
1999 - Vermont graph 49 50.2 View Actions
1999 - Vermont graph 6 11.5 View Actions
2000 - Vermont graph 5 10.3 View Actions
2000 - Vermont graph 47 33.8 View Actions
2001 - Vermont graph 45 18.9 View Actions
2001 - Vermont graph 5 9.7 View Actions
2002 - Vermont graph 9 9.9 View Actions
2002 - Vermont graph 50 32.6 View Actions
2003 - Vermont graph 50 33.0 View Actions
2003 - Vermont graph 10 8.8 View Actions
2004 - Vermont graph 10 8.0 View Actions
2004 - Vermont graph 49 25.5 View Actions
2005 - Vermont graph 49 20.9 View Actions
2005 - Vermont graph 7 7.3 View Actions
2006 - Vermont graph 9 7.1 View Actions
2006 - Vermont graph 46 21.6 View Actions
2007 - Vermont graph 42 23.0 View Actions
2007 - Vermont graph 8 6.4 View Actions
2008 - Vermont graph 7 5.7 View Actions
2008 - Vermont graph 41 17.4 View Actions
2009 - Vermont graph 48 16.2 View Actions
2009 - Vermont graph 5 4.3 View Actions
2010 - Vermont graph 4 3.6 View Actions
2010 - Vermont graph 27 8.5 View Actions
2011 - Vermont graph 2 3.1 View Actions
2012 - Vermont graph 1 2.8 View Actions
  • 1990 - 2013
    Annual Report
  • 2013
    Senior Report

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