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Dedicated Health Care Provider, 2018 Senior Report
Measure: Dedicated Health Care Provider - Ages 65+, 2018 Senior Report

Why does this matter?

Individuals with a dedicated health care provider are better positioned to receive care that can prevent, detect and manage health conditions than those without a dedicated provider. Primary care providers are an integral part of the health and well-being of individuals, particularly older adults. Having a regular health care provider helps patients and providers build stable, long-term relationships that are associated with several benefits, including:

For older adults, obstacles to obtaining a dedicated health care provider include limited availability of services, financial constraints, lack of proper insurance coverage, lack of culturally competent care and language and transportation barriers.

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016



Diabetes Management, 2018 Senior Report
Source:
  • The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, 2015



Flu Vaccine, 2018 Senior Report
Measure: Flu Vaccination - Ages 65+, 2018 Senior Report

Why does this matter?

As immune defense systems weaken with age, older adults have an increased risk of contracting influenza (flu) viruses and having serious health complications as a result of infection. The flu vaccine helps protect individuals against seasonal flu viruses, which can pose a serious threat to the health of older adults. It is estimated that in recent years, the rate of flu-related deaths was highest among adults ages 65 and older compared with all other age groups.

Among adults ages 65 and older, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated more than 1.9 million flu cases, nearly 177,000 flu-related hospitalizations and over 11,000 deaths occurred during the 2019-2020 flu season. Flu-related hospitalizations have decreased by around 50% among older adults who received flu shots, including those ages 75 and older.

Flu vaccination is a cost-effective intervention with direct cost savings estimated at more than $100 for every older adult receiving the vaccine. A recent study found that the annual economic burden of influenza among older adults ages 65 and older was $2.4 billion, including direct medical and indirect medical costs.

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016



Health Screenings, 2018 Senior Report
Measure: Cancer Screenings - Ages 65-75, 2018 Senior Report

Why does this matter?

Screening may lead to early cancer detection, when treatment is easiest and most effective. This measure is limited to two types of cancer screenings — breast and colorectal cancer. Mammography and colorectal cancer screenings have saved many lives and are important methods to prevent cancer deaths. Of all age groups, women ages 60 to 69 years are most likely to avoid dying from breast cancer due to mammography screening. Experts agree on the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening compared with no screening — though estimates of potential cost-savings vary and studies disagree as to which screening method is most effective or offers the greatest savings. 

Despite their effectiveness in preventing cancers, the rates of mammography and colorectal cancer screening remain below national targets. Barriers to receiving cancer screenings include being uninsured and not having a usual source of care.

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016



Home Health Care, 2018 Senior Report
Source:
  • ,



Hospice Care*, 2018 Senior Report
Source:
  • The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, 2014



Hospital Deaths*, 2018 Senior Report
Source:
  • The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, 2014



Hospital Readmissions, 2018 Senior Report
Source:
  • The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, 2015



Preventable Hospitalizations, 2018 Senior Report
Source:
  • The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, 2015


*The data appearing in this edition are the same that appeared in the 2017 edition. A data update was not available at the time of this publication.

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