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Cervical Cancer Screening, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report
Measure: Cervical Cancer Screening, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report

Why does this matter?

Most cases of cervical cancer occur in females who have not received proper screening. Cervical cancer is preventable and treatable due to the availability of screening tests and vaccines. Increased screening in the form of routine Pap tests have contributed to significant declines in cervical cancer mortality over the past 40 years. However, in 2012 nearly 8 million women ages 21 to 65 had not been screened in the last five years and screening may have declined during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 12,733 women in the United States were diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2018 and 4,138 women died from it. The main cause of cervical cancer is the human papillomavirus (HPV), a common virus transmitted during sexual contact. It is estimated that nearly all sexually active people will get HPV at some point during their lifetimes

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016



Dedicated Health Care Provider - Women, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report
Measure: Dedicated Health Care Provider - Women, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report

Why does this matter?

Primary care providers are specialized in establishing a long-lasting relationship with their patients and are their medical point of contact. They diagnose, treat and prevent a wide variety of conditions in a way that is tailored to each individual patient. Having a dedicated health care provider, or a provider considered to be one’s personal doctor, is associated with elements of successful health care, such as improvements in chronic care management for conditions such as hypertension and high cholesterol

A regular provider can help with care coordination and continuity, particularly for women, who often rely on at least two providers for routine care (obstetricians or gynecologists for reproductive care and primary care providers for general health care). Studies have found that among women ages 20-64, those having a usual place of care and usual provider are about four times more likely to receive a clinical breast exam and cervical cancer screening than women without either.

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016-2017



Dental Visit - Women, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report
Measure: Dental Visit - Women, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report

Why does this matter?

Oral health is a vital component of overall health. Oral diseases such as tooth decay, dental caries (cavities), gingivitis and periodontal (gum) disease are common and can contribute to mild to severe health issues if left undiagnosed and untreated. 

Poor oral health can negatively impact quality of life by causing pain and/or tooth loss affecting one’s ability to chew, speak and interact socially. Further, inflammation associated with periodontal disease has been linked to several chronic diseases including diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, respiratory disease and oral cancer. Over 40% of adults report feeling mouth pain in the past year and 80% of people have at least one cavity by age 34.

Good oral health is particularly important during pregnancy as physiological changes may put pregnant women at higher risk of new or exacerbated oral health problems. For example, increased inflammatory response to dental plaque during pregnancy may cause pregnancy gingivitis. Other common oral health conditions that occur during pregnancy include tooth erosion, cavities and periodontal disease.

The most commonly cited reason for not having visited a dentist within the past year is cost of care. Lack of insurance and the high cost of care are barriers to routine dental visits. This may result in an increase in the use of emergency care.

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016



Flu Vaccination - Women, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report
Measure: Flu Vaccination - Women, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report

Why does this matter?

The flu vaccine helps protect people against seasonal influenza (flu) viruses that may lead to severe complications. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that during the 2019-2020 flu season, vaccines prevented 7.5 million illnesses and over 105,000 hospitalizations associated with influenza. 

While all women are at risk of complications from influenza (including bacterial pneumonia, bronchitis as well as sinus and ear infections), pregnant women are at greater risk of severe illness, hospitalization and even death from the flu. Influenza-related complications among pregnant women can lead to an increased risk of preterm delivery, low birthweight infants and other complications. Among pregnant women, the flu shot reduced the risk of being hospitalized with the flu by an average of 40% during 2010-2016. Getting the flu vaccine while pregnant also helps protect babies from flu illness in the first several months after their birth, when they are too young to get vaccinated. Research finds flu vaccination is highly cost-effective among pregnant women. 

The annual economic impact of influenza on the United States in 2015 was approximately $11.2 billion.

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016-2017



Well-Woman Visit, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report
Measure: Well-woman Visit, 2019 Health Of Women And Children Report

Why does this matter?

Annual health exams provide an opportunity for women to access preventive services and discuss strategies to minimize health risks and achieve a healthy lifestyle. Based on age and risk, annual assessments should include:

  • Screenings for disease.
  • Health history review.
  • Counseling and health education.
  • Immunizations based on age and risk.

Regular well-woman visits are recommended even if certain aspects of the visit, such as a cervical cancer screening, are not performed each year. 

Addressing health risks such as smoking, obesity and alcohol use through preventive services such as patient counselling and education have been found to be a cost-effective way of improving health.

Source:
  • CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016-2017

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