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Childhood Immunizations
Childhood Immunizations in Iowa
Iowa

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Iowa Value:

75.5%

Percentage of children who received by age 24 months all recommended doses of the combined seven-vaccine series: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine; poliovirus vaccine; Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine; hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine; varicella vaccine; and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)

Iowa Rank:

11

Childhood Immunizations in depth:

Childhood Immunizations by State

Percentage of children who received by age 24 months all recommended doses of the combined seven-vaccine series: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine; poliovirus vaccine; Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine; hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine; varicella vaccine; and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)




Childhood Immunizations Trends

Percentage of children who received by age 24 months all recommended doses of the combined seven-vaccine series: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine; poliovirus vaccine; Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine; hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine; varicella vaccine; and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)

Trend: Childhood Immunizations in Iowa, United States, 2023 Annual Report

Percentage of children who received by age 24 months all recommended doses of the combined seven-vaccine series: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine; poliovirus vaccine; Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine; hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine; varicella vaccine; and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)

Iowa
United States
Source:

 CDC, National Immunization Survey-Child

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About Childhood Immunizations

US Value: 70.0%

Top State(s): Connecticut: 81.2%

Bottom State(s): Alaska: 61.8%

Definition: Percentage of children who received by age 24 months all recommended doses of the combined seven-vaccine series: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine; poliovirus vaccine; Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine; hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine; varicella vaccine; and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)

Data Source and Years: CDC, National Immunization Survey-Child, 2017-2018 Birth Cohort

Suggested Citation: America's Health Rankings analysis of CDC, National Immunization Survey-Child, United Health Foundation, AmericasHealthRankings.org, accessed 2023.

Early childhood immunizations are a safe and cost-effective way of protecting children from potentially life-threatening preventable diseases early in life when they are most vulnerable. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends infants receive the full combined seven-vaccine series, which protects against 14 different diseases, by age 24 months. The success of vaccines in controlling many infectious diseases led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to name vaccines one of the Ten Great Public Health Achievements of the 20th century.

In 1994, the Vaccines for Children Program expanded access to life-saving vaccines against childhood illnesses. A 2014 review of the program calculated that children born between 1994 and 2013 will, over the course of their lifetimes, be spared 322 million cases of disease, 21 million hospitalizations and 732,000 premature deaths due to vaccine-preventable diseases. These estimates translate to net savings of $295 billion in direct costs and $1.38 trillion in total societal costs.

According to the National Immunization Survey, the vaccination coverage among young children for the combined seven-vaccine series was lower among:

Achieving and maintaining high vaccination coverage is critical to reduce the impact of vaccine-preventable diseases. The CDC supports immunization operations at the local, state and national levels through funding and initiatives such as the Vaccines for Children Program, which provides free vaccines to children whose health insurance does not cover them. The 2010 Affordable Care Act requires health insurance plans to cover preventive services, including immunizations, without charging deductibles, copayments or coinsurance. This legislation allows the Vaccines for Children Program to provide eligible children with access to vaccines at no cost through certain doctors. 

The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommendations to increase vaccination rates include:

  • Expanding access to vaccines in health care settings.
  • Expanding home visiting services.
  • Establishing vaccination programs in schools and child care centers.
  • Increasing community demand for vaccinations through active outreach, tracking, education, incentives and case management as well as reminder and recall systems. 

The spread of misinformation about vaccine safety accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic, causing a spike in opposition to state and school vaccine requirements. The Public Health Communications Collaborative has recommendations for providers, public health agencies and anyone else crafting messaging to promote routine childhood vaccinations in their community. These include:

  • Emphasizing the individual health benefits of vaccinations.
  • Keeping COVID-19 vaccination messaging separate from messaging about routine childhood vaccinations.
  • Working with trusted community leaders and organizations to deliver accurate information regarding vaccinations.

Healthy People 2030 has several vaccination objectives focused on children, including reducing the proportion of children who get no recommended vaccinations by age 2. 

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Ten Great Public Health Achievements -- United States, 1900-1999.” MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 48, no. 12 (April 2, 1999): 241–43. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00056796.htm.

Hill, Holly A., Laurie D. Elam-Evans, David Yankey, James A. Singleton, and Yoonjae Kang. “Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19–35 Months — United States, 2017.” MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 67, no. 40 (October 12, 2018): 1123–28. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6740a4.

Whitney, Cynthia G., Fangjun Zhou, James Singleton, and Anne Schuchat. “Benefits from Immunization during the Vaccines for Children Program Era - United States, 1994-2013.” MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63, no. 16 (April 25, 2014): 352–55.
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6316a4.htm?s_cid=mm6316a4_w.

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